Archive for August 18th, 2005

18th August
2005
written by Caryn

Well we all knew it was going to come to this sooner or later, didn’t we? We have the US divided up into NBC and CNN zoomtastic regional maps of red states and blue states, the latest “hip” read is Divided Kingdom which ostensibly bastardizes Hippocrates’ four humors and the basis of Galenic medicine* for its own predictable ill-gotten publishing gains, Baskin-Robbins and their 32 flavors … you get the idea, I’m sure. But really, regardless of race, creed, religion or boy band preference, it all comes down to one question. And that is:

Are you the peanut butter or are you the jelly?

Recently it was said that William Vollman and Nietzsche “go together like peanut butter and jelly”. It’s a phrase we often use, but really it’s more telling and profound than it may appear on the surface. Saying something goes “together like peanut butter and jelly” begs the question … what’s the peanut butter and what’s the jelly? What are the constants in this social/psychological formula? Peanut butter. Jelly. A symbiosis of bagged lunch staples … a sticky union of … dare I say … the yin and yang? These seemingly common substances, enjoyable each in their own right, coming together with a magnetic force. Doesn’t this expose a unique property that we all must possess in either one form or the other? The peanut butter. The jelly. Coming together, interacting, creating something new … just like we are all components of our own creations.

There are many variations and ingredients that you could choose to substitute, but these are masks, illusions. Once you cast them away, you will see that it all funnels into one irrefutable assignment.

Are you the peanut butter or are you the jelly?

It’s time to toss away any preconceived notions and assumptions … any previous associations. Clear your mind. Do not try to analyze, but just hear what you are.

Are you the peanut butter or are you the jelly?

Tomorrow I shall expand on this lesson in sociophilosophical evolution. Until then. Go on, ask yourself.

*Big shout out to Purdue University’s Lois Magner and the History of Medicine coursework. I knew that would come in useful.

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